Leaving Time by Jodi Picoult

Review   Summary For over a decade, Jenna Metcalf obsesses on her vanished mom Alice. Jenna searches online, rereads journals of the scientist who studied grief among elephants. Two unlikely allies are Serenity Jones, psychic for missing people who doubts her gift, and Virgil Stanhope, jaded PI who originally investigated cases of Alice and her …

Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights by Salman Rushdie

Ok, first of all I’ve got to admit that I’ve become a big fan of Rushdie’s writing style, in spite of the fact that I think he’s kind of an arrogant dillhole. However, his writing style is VERY unique and certainly not for everyone, so keep in mind that you might react to his books …

Midnight’s Children by Salman Rushdie

The plot of Midnight’s Children revolves around the life of Saleem Sinai, a boy born in Bombay at the exact stroke of midnight when India achieved independence from British rule. Due to this ominous birth, Saleem’s life (and the lives of 1,000 other children born during that midnight hour) becomes magically and devastatingly intertwined with the life of the new India. Remember how, in Forest Gump, Gump always stumbles into some important moment in history by accident, or how his actions somehow lead to an important event taking place? Midnight’s Children is like that, but the tale is woven and braided together in such a complicated pattern that it’s difficult to understand how only one mind could have contained and produced it all. Elements repeat subtly and enchantingly; sorrow and joy are intertwined with such complexity that one feels, upon finishing the book, that one has lived through someone else’s lifetime—it’s exhausting and disorienting to say the least, and yet it’s an experience unparalleled in all my years of reading.

First Frost, by Sarah Addison Allen

Captivating. That was the word floating in my head from the first to the last page of First Frost. Allen’s prose winds itself around your senses, wrapping tiny tendrils of wonder through your imagination. The book manages an almost effortless mingling of bright, dream-peppered youth and astute yet self-questioning adulthood. This seamless narrative concoction lends …